[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 2167: Array to string conversion
Is the skills shortage a myth? :: Asperger Technical

 

Username:  Remember me?
Password:




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Is the skills shortage a myth?
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 1:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: 3rd April, 2007
Posts: 90
I have been wondering if the so called skills shortage really is a myth - or even an outright lie for that matter. My own part of the country, the south of Hampshire, has a dynamic economy with a higher than average number of employers of people skilled in engineering and IT, and a lower than average unemployment rate. The job market is characterised by thousands of unskilled, dead end, and badly paid vacancies that employers cannot fill, and tough competition for any jobs that require any reasonable level of skills and qualifications. In recent years a large number of eastern Europeans have moved into the area and most are employed in unskilled dead end jobs such as rinsing out beer glasses in pubs. The only skilled jobs they are taking in significant numbers are in construction where there was a serious shortage a few years ago (but not any more) because of lack of training facilities for school leavers.


Top
 Profile  
 
Share this information
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Diigo
  • DZone
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo
     Post subject: A view
    Post Number:#2  PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:23 pm 
    Offline

    Joined: 30th July, 2007
    Posts: 2
    Location: UK
    I'm just over the county boundary to the north where the situation is broadly similar except for few engineering/IT jobs.

    I think the government talk of a skills shortage, demanding almost degrees for all is a nonesense, there have to be the majority doing work which does not require a degree. On the other hand employers talk about "useless" graduates where having seen some of them, I tend to concur. I do not mean to bad mouth individuals, there are some wonderful new graduates.

    Education should be about producing real practical people with some common sense even if it isn't directly vocational. An awful lot of people seem to have this view including many teachers. Maybe I am a grumpy old git. :-)

    However, there are vast issues which make most of the above almost irrelevant. UK Ltd is in my view close to bankrupt, would be far in the red but for earnings which are of a nebulous nature. (now >£1,000 pa for every person). If the finance sector catches cold we are in big trouble.

    As a country the UK is roughly 80% service industry, 19% manufacturing and 1% agriculture. You cannot eat service. Somehow we have to pay but things are so skewed in the world that competing is now very difficult, in essence many jobs have gone to economies with a wildly different standard of living and services, China, India and so on.

    Then there are awkward ethical issues such as should we manufacture weapons? If so what.

    Goodness knows what the money pouring into eg. China is going to do especially with China having to import energy. The Yuan is artifcially set, something that cannot last. Then what about the US dollar, not in a good state. Keep in mind that wars tend to mess up economies.

    Where does this leave us as far as jobs for head people is concerned?
    There is a glimmer but I'm not saying in public, yet I see little sign of the opportunity being taken, which has to be done by people with investment money.


    Top
     Profile  
     
    Share this information
    • Delicious
    • Digg
    • Diigo
    • DZone
    • Facebook
    • Google
    • LinkedIn
    • MySpace
    • Reddit
    • Slashdot
    • StumbleUpon
    • Twitter
    • Yahoo
       Post subject:
      Post Number:#3  PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:05 pm 
      Offline

      Joined: 3rd April, 2007
      Posts: 90
      The obsession with qualifications goes back to the recession of the early 1990s.

      Back in the 1980s, British society didn't really care much about education and qualifications. Parents would send their children to school and they wouldn't really care less what their children were and weren't learning. Many primary schools taught a rather invariable quality of education because there was no incentive to do any better. Extra studying and tuition outside of school was rare. Few people went on to higher education, and most just got a job after school. The prevailing attitude was to climb the ladder and many people with little in the way of qualifications who started work in the 1970s did very well careerwise during the 1980s.

      Next came a big recession and millions of office workers and middle managers were thrown on the scrapheap of unemployment. Attitudes changed because those with good qualifications were more likely to stay employed than those without. The result was that society took more of an interest in education and a higher proportion of young people went to university.

      Now we have ended up with a glut of graduates and not enough graduate jobs. It is politically incorrect to say so, but degrees are not equal when it comes to employment. Some subjects such as history or English do not lead to careers other than teaching. The majority of jobs do not require a degree, and most jobs that require a degree today required a degree 10 or 20 years ago. They also require degrees in specific subjects and not a degree in any subject.

      The government bangs on about there will be no unskilled jobs for people without qualifications in the future. The old mining and industrial jobs may be history but look in any local local newspaper or at the Job Centre and you will find millions of dead end unskilled jobs in the service sector paying close to minimum wage. Cleaning, catering, retail, leisure and entertainment. These jobs aren't going to go away in the foreseeable future.

      The biggest question is whether there will be jobs for people with a high level of qualifications and skills in the future. Traditionally in times of recession or when technology changed, it was the people without skills and qualifications who bore the brunt of things. The last recession of the early 1990s was a conventional straightforward recession that affected just about every industry and sector of the economy bar liquidation lawyers. In the last 5 or so years a rather strange type of recession never seen before has emerged in Britain. It is the jobs requiring skills and qualifications that are under threat from outsourcing to low wage countries, but jobs that require no skills or qualifications which cannot be outsourced remain safe - for the time being.

      In contrast to the increase in young people going to university, there has been an increase in the number of home schooled children in the past 10 or so years. Home schooling was virtually nonexistent in Britain until the mid 1990s but is such a fast growing thing that it has sometimes been referred to as a quiet revolution. The exact number of home schooled children is unknown because of a lack of an official register, but has probably broken the 200,000 mark and grows by about 4-5% each year.

      Contrary to popular belief, most home schooled children are not prodigies or geniuses. They are home schooled because parents believe that school is too academic and doesn't prepare children for the real world by teaching them useful life skills. Only about half of all home schooled children take GCSEs and usually in just 2 or 3 subjects. Some home schooling parents I have met expressed grave doubts on whether there will be jobs for academically minded people in the future that schools are churning out. My findings are that home schooled children tend to be more creative than academic, and are also better at relating to adults than children who attend mainstream schools. There have been a few words in the mainstream press that home schooled children are the entrepreneurs of the future although there is no real evidence to suggest this and it's too early to tell at the moment.

      The majority of children with Asperger syndrome attend mainstream school. Usually this is because the decision of school vs home schooling is down to the attitude of the parents rather than what is best for the children. Another reason is because the children are of higher than average intelligence in several subjects and the parents feel that they would lose educational facilities (such as science labs) if their children were home schooled. The knowledge of how to take GCSEs out of the school system as a private candidate isn't very well known in the Asperger syndrome community, although the mainstream home schooling community has known about this for many years.

      What is the future for people with Asperger syndrome? Most parents of children with Asperger syndrome that I speak to are so tied up with school related issues that they overlook what will happen to their children once they become adults. Services for adults with Asperger syndrome are very underdeveloped at the moment. This was one reason why Asperger Technical was established.


      Top
       Profile  
       
      Share this information
      • Delicious
      • Digg
      • Diigo
      • DZone
      • Facebook
      • Google
      • LinkedIn
      • MySpace
      • Reddit
      • Slashdot
      • StumbleUpon
      • Twitter
      • Yahoo
         Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
        Post Number:#4  PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 1:52 pm 
        Offline

        Joined: 13th July, 2009
        Posts: 10
        Can I infer from the arguments put forth by canopus and timc that the metric used by the government to measure the number of skilled people is incorrect ? Is the government only looking at artisans and medical staff rather than IT, finance or the legal professions ? Are wine-makers counted but not a specialist in tax law ?

        Australia has a shortage of artisans and they have been poaching them from all over the world - especially South Africa. So, perhaps the phrase "skills shortage" should be fleshed out a bit more. Something like "shortage of artisans".


        Top
         Profile  
         
        Share this information
        • Delicious
        • Digg
        • Diigo
        • DZone
        • Facebook
        • Google
        • LinkedIn
        • MySpace
        • Reddit
        • Slashdot
        • StumbleUpon
        • Twitter
        • Yahoo
           Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
          Post Number:#5  PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:58 am 
          Offline

          Joined: 3rd April, 2007
          Posts: 90
          chermoula wrote:
          Can I infer from the arguments put forth by canopus and timc that the metric used by the government to measure the number of skilled people is incorrect ? Is the government only looking at artisans and medical staff rather than IT, finance or the legal professions ? Are wine-makers counted but not a specialist in tax law ?


          Nobody seems to even have a rough idea what the metric used by the government to measure the number of skilled people is - and I personally don't even think the government knows themselves. More than one person has informed me that calculations are derived from the number of unfilled job vacancies with the government citing a reason for the vacancy remaining unfilled is a lack of people with the required skills. Anybody with an ounce of common sense will know that many reasons exist for vacancies remaining unfilled (even in a recession) and a shortage of suitably skilled people is only one of them.

          Quote:
          Australia has a shortage of artisans and they have been poaching them from all over the world - especially South Africa. So, perhaps the phrase "skills shortage" should be fleshed out a bit more. Something like "shortage of artisans".


          Unless the government specifically outlines which types of skilled people are in short supply then saying there is a skills shortage is plain weasel words.


          Top
           Profile  
           
          Share this information
          • Delicious
          • Digg
          • Diigo
          • DZone
          • Facebook
          • Google
          • LinkedIn
          • MySpace
          • Reddit
          • Slashdot
          • StumbleUpon
          • Twitter
          • Yahoo
             Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
            Post Number:#6  PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:28 pm 
            Offline

            Joined: 11th May, 2010
            Posts: 60
            Location: Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
            "There has been a great deal of hype about the 'IT skills shortage' for many years, but for the most part this is a myth encouraged by recruitment agencies and especially by large outsourcing consultancies."
            IT prospects not so great


            Top
             Profile  
             
            Share this information
            • Delicious
            • Digg
            • Diigo
            • DZone
            • Facebook
            • Google
            • LinkedIn
            • MySpace
            • Reddit
            • Slashdot
            • StumbleUpon
            • Twitter
            • Yahoo
               Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
              Post Number:#7  PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2010 8:04 pm 
              Offline

              Joined: 3rd April, 2007
              Posts: 90
              Some comments about statements in IT prospects not so great

              the general lack of organised labour in the IT industry

              There are no specific trade unions for IT workers. It has been mentioned here before that technically minded people are generally individualistic and therefore reluctant to want to join a guild or a movement to represent them. The article A High-Tech Worker's Guide to Globalization's Myths makes a case for forming associations for high-tech workers and mentions that technical professionals in Germany and France are well organized and proud of it. The same is true of much of the engineering profession in India.

              The Solidarity Trade Union strongly opposes globalision, and is a union for every occupation and profession, but it has not yet managed to attract many people from the IT industry.

              "I realise too that this debate is often caricatured dismissively as "British jobs for British workers", whereas I would see it as a question of "UK-based jobs on sustainable UK salaries for UK-based workers".

              Few people who work in IT are politicised or willing to resort to taking action in order to protect their jobs like the coal miners did back in the 80s or the oil refinery workers did in the wildcat strikes last year. I have not encountered many IT workers who are sympathetic towards nationalism or protectionism which means that the straightforward British jobs for British workers is less likely to strike a chord with them than it does with people in blue collar occupations when Johnny Foreigner is about to take their job. I think that the aversion to protectionism and British jobs for British workers stems from many IT workers going round thinking that they are professionals, and that professionals should not get involved with radical or alternative politics of any description.


              Top
               Profile  
               
              Share this information
              • Delicious
              • Digg
              • Diigo
              • DZone
              • Facebook
              • Google
              • LinkedIn
              • MySpace
              • Reddit
              • Slashdot
              • StumbleUpon
              • Twitter
              • Yahoo
                 Post subject: Re:
                Post Number:#8  PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 6:21 pm 
                Offline

                Joined: 11th May, 2010
                Posts: 60
                Location: Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
                Canopus wrote:
                The obsession with qualifications goes back to the recession of the early 1990s.

                Back in the 1980s, British society didn't really care much about education and qualifications. Parents would send their children to school and they wouldn't really care less what their children were and weren't learning. Many primary schools taught a rather invariable quality of education because there was no incentive to do any better. Extra studying and tuition outside of school was rare. Few people went on to higher education, and most just got a job after school. The prevailing attitude was to climb the ladder and many people with little in the way of qualifications who started work in the 1970s did very well careerwise during the 1980s.

                Next came a big recession and millions of office workers and middle managers were thrown on the scrapheap of unemployment. Attitudes changed because those with good qualifications were more likely to stay employed than those without. The result was that society took more of an interest in education and a higher proportion of young people went to university.

                Now we have ended up with a glut of graduates and not enough graduate jobs. It is politically incorrect to say so, but degrees are not equal when it comes to employment. Some subjects such as history or English do not lead to careers other than teaching. The majority of jobs do not require a degree, and most jobs that require a degree today required a degree 10 or 20 years ago. They also require degrees in specific subjects and not a degree in any subject.

                That so? When I graduated in the late 90s careers advisors were always wont to point out that around 40% of advertised job vacancies (including accountancy!) were for graduates of any discipline. Since I lost my job I've had more than one person lecture me about how I've allowed my career choice to be overly dictated by my degree subject (but it's not as if I have oodles of people skills or business acumen to fall back on, have I?).


                Top
                 Profile  
                 
                Share this information
                • Delicious
                • Digg
                • Diigo
                • DZone
                • Facebook
                • Google
                • LinkedIn
                • MySpace
                • Reddit
                • Slashdot
                • StumbleUpon
                • Twitter
                • Yahoo
                   Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
                  Post Number:#9  PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:04 am 
                  Offline

                  Joined: 11th May, 2010
                  Posts: 60
                  Location: Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
                  Aeolienne wrote:
                  "There has been a great deal of hype about the 'IT skills shortage' for many years, but for the most part this is a myth encouraged by recruitment agencies and especially by large outsourcing consultancies."
                  IT prospects not so great

                  *necrobump*
                  And from a US perspective...


                  Top
                   Profile  
                   
                  Share this information
                  • Delicious
                  • Digg
                  • Diigo
                  • DZone
                  • Facebook
                  • Google
                  • LinkedIn
                  • MySpace
                  • Reddit
                  • Slashdot
                  • StumbleUpon
                  • Twitter
                  • Yahoo
                     Post subject: Re: Is the skills shortage a myth?
                    Post Number:#10  PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2014 12:18 pm 
                    Offline

                    Joined: 11th May, 2010
                    Posts: 60
                    Location: Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
                    Plus ça change.
                    Politicians are jeopardising UK tech by failing to tackle our severe skills shortages


                    Top
                     Profile  
                     
                    Share this information
                    • Delicious
                    • Digg
                    • Diigo
                    • DZone
                    • Facebook
                    • Google
                    • LinkedIn
                    • MySpace
                    • Reddit
                    • Slashdot
                    • StumbleUpon
                    • Twitter
                    • Yahoo
                      Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
                      Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

                      All times are UTC


                      Who is online

                      Registered users: No registered users


                      You cannot post new topics in this forum
                      You cannot reply to topics in this forum
                      You cannot edit your posts in this forum
                      You cannot delete your posts in this forum
                      You cannot post attachments in this forum

                      Search for:
                      Jump to:  
                      cron
                      This forum is powered by phpBB