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Demand for UK tech and computing grads to soar :: Asperger Technical

 

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 Post subject: Demand for UK tech and computing grads to soar
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:02 pm 
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Joined: 1st June, 2007
Posts: 48
As retirement punches holes in tech workforce...

silicon.com

A report into UK demand for science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) graduates over the next eight years has projected growing requirements for tech and computing grads - and warned companies are likely to find it increasingly difficult to find the skills they need.

The report, The Demand for STEM Graduates: some benchmark projections, was compiled by the Warwick Institute for Employment Research for the government's Department for Innovation Universities and Skills among others. It predicts the biggest increase in demand will be for biological science graduates, with a 122 per cent hike expected by 2017.

But demand for mathematical science and computing grads is set to be the next largest growth area, with a 95 per cent increase, followed by demand for technology graduates (80 per cent).

The report states: "The results suggest that, apart from medicine, the demand for most Stem subjects is likely to grow faster than for other disciplines over the coming decade. The present analysis does not enable a direct comparison with likely supply. However, if recent trends of young people moving away from Stem subjects continue, these results suggest that companies and organisations dependent on high quality Stem personnel will find it increasingly difficult to find the skills that they will need to operate and compete successfully."

The report adds that the older "age profile" of Stem-qualified workers means there will also be a significant need to plug workforce gaps created through retirement over the coming decade. "This need to refresh talent (replacement demand) is at least as important as so-called expansion demand arising from projected increases in employment levels for such workers," it says.

The report also points to an accelerating shift towards more highly skilled jobs. "Growth in employment is expected to be fastest for those qualified at the highest levels, while the number of those in employment with no or few formal qualifications is projected to decline," it states.


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     Post subject: Re: Demand for UK tech and computing grads to soar
    Post Number:#2  PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2009 9:21 am 
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    Joined: 3rd April, 2007
    Posts: 90
    Reseda wrote:
    As retirement punches holes in tech workforce...

    silicon.com

    A report into UK demand for science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) graduates over the next eight years has projected growing requirements for tech and computing grads - and warned companies are likely to find it increasingly difficult to find the skills they need.


    Where is this report? I would like to read it.

    I have received scraps of information that thousands of older scientists and engineers will retire over the next few years which will lead to a vast increase in the number of vacancies in these sectors. However, will employers want to replace like with like, in other words, experienced senior scientists and engineers by the same type of people, or will they create vacancies for graduates and more junior scientists and engineers. My bet is that an appalling 'skills shortage' will emerge where employers cannot find scientists and engineers with many years of experience because they simply do not exist whilst graduates and more junior scientists and engineers cannot get a foot in the door because vacancies do not exist for them. The end result will be companies filling their vacancies with immigrants, or even moving or outsourcing their research and technical departments overseas.

    Quote:
    The report, The Demand for STEM Graduates: some benchmark projections, was compiled by the Warwick Institute for Employment Research for the government's Department for Innovation Universities and Skills among others. It predicts the biggest increase in demand will be for biological science graduates, with a 122 per cent hike expected by 2017.


    This is intriguing. Who will be employing these biological science graduates? From what I have read, a lower proportion of biological science graduates (except in subjects allied to medicine) end up in careers that make use of their knowledge and qualifications compared to graduates in computing and engineering subjects. Some biological science courses are reputed to be quite poor for career prospects. Before anybody starts talking about a revolution in biotechnology, please tell me where the market is for such products.

    Quote:
    But demand for mathematical science and computing grads is set to be the next largest growth area, with a 95 per cent increase, followed by demand for technology graduates (80 per cent).


    I dispute these figures. What evidence exists to back them up?

    Quote:
    The report states: "The results suggest that, apart from medicine, the demand for most Stem subjects is likely to grow faster than for other disciplines over the coming decade. The present analysis does not enable a direct comparison with likely supply. However, if recent trends of young people moving away from Stem subjects continue, these results suggest that companies and organisations dependent on high quality Stem personnel will find it increasingly difficult to find the skills that they will need to operate and compete successfully."


    Why would companies want British graduates and junior scientists and engineers when they can employ immigrants with the necessary skills and experience or easily outsource technical work to foreign countries?

    Quote:
    The report adds that the older "age profile" of Stem-qualified workers means there will also be a significant need to plug workforce gaps created through retirement over the coming decade. "This need to refresh talent (replacement demand) is at least as important as so-called expansion demand arising from projected increases in employment levels for such workers," it says.


    Again, the question is do employers want to replace like with like or will they be happy to create vacancies for graduates and junior scientists and engineers?

    Quote:
    The report also points to an accelerating shift towards more highly skilled jobs. "Growth in employment is expected to be fastest for those qualified at the highest levels, while the number of those in employment with no or few formal qualifications is projected to decline," it states.


    This is utter nonsense. Low skilled service sector jobs are here to stay for the forseeable future and no evidence exists that they will disappear. There will always be abundant jobs in cleaning, catering / food preparation, transport, retail, office temping, warehouse / packing, caring for people, and security work. This is because (British) society needs people employed in such roles and these jobs cannot be outsourced to low wage countries although vacancies can be filled with immigrants.

    The British population is aging and some economists have predicted that caring for the elderly will be a significant area of growth over the next 20 years. This is a badly paid low skilled job.

    A council official has told me that there are more refuse collectors in the UK than 10 years ago because of an expansion in doorstep recycling.

    The Japanese are working on robots to clean floors and even care for their elderly, but the UK has access to millions of Eastern Europeans who are willing to do these jobs for peanuts.


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       Post subject: Re: Demand for UK tech and computing grads to soar
      Post Number:#3  PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 3:25 pm 
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      Joined: 1st July, 2007
      Posts: 20
      Location: UK
      Canopus wrote:
      I have received scraps of information that thousands of older scientists and engineers will retire over the next few years which will lead to a vast increase in the number of vacancies in these sectors. However, will employers want to replace like with like, in other words, experienced senior scientists and engineers by the same type of people, or will they create vacancies for graduates and more junior scientists and engineers. My bet is that an appalling 'skills shortage' will emerge where employers cannot find scientists and engineers with many years of experience because they simply do not exist whilst graduates and more junior scientists and engineers cannot get a foot in the door because vacancies do not exist for them. The end result will be companies filling their vacancies with immigrants, or even moving or outsourcing their research and technical departments overseas.


      A very astute observation. There is a definite tendency for employers to want to replace like with like rather than promote existing employees to more senior positions then recruit new staff to fill more junior positions created by promotions. Does the report focus on private sector industry or does it focus on public sector institutions because there are considerable differences for STEM staff between them?

      Quote:
      Why would companies want British graduates and junior scientists and engineers when they can employ immigrants with the necessary skills and experience or easily outsource technical work to foreign countries?


      If employers cry out that there is a skills shortage because very few people in Britain have the level of technical expertise and work experience to fill vacancies then they will pressure the government to let highly skilled and experienced immigrants into the country, or else threaten to relocate entire technical departments abroad.

      Junior positions in engineering and IT are scarce at the moment although I have seen advertised jobs over 6 months old for senior positions requiring many years experience in esoteric subjects complete with a proven track record of management and team leadership.

      Quote:
      This is utter nonsense. Low skilled service sector jobs are here to stay for the forseeable future and no evidence exists that they will disappear. There will always be abundant jobs in cleaning, catering / food preparation, transport, retail, office temping, warehouse / packing, caring for people, and security work. This is because (British) society needs people employed in such roles and these jobs cannot be outsourced to low wage countries although vacancies can be filled with immigrants.


      I think the demise of low skilled jobs is vastly overstated and they always will exist in large numbers. The media and the government are biased when evaluating the health of the economy towards the low and semi skilled end of the job market rather than the highly skilled end. For example, 10,000 degree qualified electronic and software engineers losing their jobs will result in less concern by the government and the media than 10,000 retail workers losing their jobs.


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         Post subject: Re: Demand for UK tech and computing grads to soar
        Post Number:#4  PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 5:00 pm 
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        Joined: 11th May, 2010
        Posts: 59
        Location: Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
        "There has been a great deal of hype about the 'IT skills shortage' for many years, but for the most part this is a myth encouraged by recruitment agencies and especially by large outsourcing consultancies."
        IT prospects not so great


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